Posts Tagged ‘employee morale’

What Kind of Weather Are You Making? March 13 2012 no responses

For the past couple of years, I’ve had a lot of great conversations with my clients about the idea that leaders control the weather. You can test this idea for yourself right now. Have you ever worked in a place where the first question everyone asked when they arrived in the morning was, “What kind of mood is he (or she) in today?” Most of us have, and if you have, you understand right away how leaders control the weather. If the leader is sunny and bright, everyone else is likely to be sunny and bright. If the leader is stormy and cloudy, get your umbrella out.

If you’re the leader, what you say and how you say it matters. A lot. In this Coachable Moment video from “The Next Level” self-assessment, I offer three simple, practical and immediately applicable ideas on how you can get a handle on the impact of your comments on the organization and make your own appropriate choices.

Don’t forget to read the first four posts in this series, which originally ran in SmartBlog on Leadership. (For more business leadership news from SmartBrief, sign up for SmartBrief on Leadership.)

Want more information? Take the free leadership self-assessment, which takes about five minutes and gives you a picture of how you stack up on three key components of leadership presence: personal, team and organizational.

Rypple’s Nick Stein, on How to Deliver Better Feedback February 2 2012 7 responses

Rypple is a web-based social performance management platform that helps companies improve performance through social goals, continuous feedback and meaningful recognition. I recently spoke with Rypple’s Nick Stein to learn more about the company and get his tips for giving – and getting – effective feedback. Here’s an edited version of our conversation.

Scott: Is it fair to say a quick description of Rypple would be Facebook for feedback?

Nick: I think that feedback is certainly a very important part of it. But I’d say that the feedback should be focused around aligning people within the organization so that they feel empowered and that people who lead your organization feel confident that everybody is moving in the same direction. So it’s feedback, but it’s feedback that leads directly to business results.

When it comes to feedback, how much is enough?

When most of us think traditionally of feedback within an organization, we think of the performance review, which a lot of companies still use and they do them once a year. And they’re backward-looking and have really morphed into this thing that’s much more about compliance than it is about performance.

When we look at feedback, we hear from our customers and tons of research that’s been done out there that employees are craving feedback, and as much of it as they can get. And I think that’s particularly true for the Millennials, who really have grown up around the idea of getting constant feedback that they can then use to get better at what they do.

What are your top tips for making the feedback useful? For somebody who wants to be really effective in providing feedback, what are two or three things they should always keep in mind?

What Do People Want From Work? January 9 2012 13 responses

Other than the basic requirements – food, shelter, health care – on the hierarchy of needs, what do people really want from their jobs?

Last week I attended a presentation from Peter Cappelli, a Wharton professor and thought leader on talent management, where he addressed that question. Based on a study he cited, these are the top five things that a large group of people say they want from their work:

1. Friendly environment
2. Chance to use my skills
3. Chance to do something worthwhile
4. Feeling respected by coworkers
5. The opportunity to learn something new

Is there anything on the list that’s really that surprising? If you stop and think about it, you probably want those things from your own work.

Here’s the catch on the data that Cappelli shared. He presented it in the content of a talk on managing the older generation of workers and the data comes from a study that AARP conducted on what older workers want.

Is the list really that different that what workers of any age would want? My experience and observations tell me no. People want to work in an environment where they feel respected and appreciated, where they can learn and do their best work.

What does your experience tell you? What’s on your short list of the most important things that leaders can do to create a place where people want to work?